Temp. Importing a Foriegn Reg. Mbike into Thailand

blackwolf

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Just some update on FaceBook.
I guy called Dave from Pattaya is help a lot of overland rides/divers getting into Thailand without the need of a guild.

Here are his details..... Overlanders - Stellplatz stop over and tour Pattaya, Thailand

Maybe worth a call.
Are you sure that's legal? A number of people on Facebook have tried to skirt around the rules and get in without a guide but they have later gotten in trouble. I personally wouldn't risk it...the rules have changed, it is what it is.
 

prince666

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Speak to Dave from Overlanders about if legal or not, please don't shoot the messenger?.
 
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blackwolf

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Well I've been going back through this thread and have noticed very similar claims posted on various FB posts over a year ago. KTMPhil has cleared up some of these issues. I have looked at the DLT rules and nothing has changed...still the same rules with guide. Therefore I remain skeptical unless something official comes in from relevant departments.
 

bsacbob

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Spotted a couple of small groups overlanders in Chiang Rai recently and spoke with a pair from Turkey, they had entered from Malaysia it was very late at night when they arrived in Chiang Rai and I pointed them to a place to stay, upon asking where the guide was they said they rode straight through the border control without any issues. So I guess it's another case of who is on the gate at the time, and if they give a toss if you have a permit or not, they went on to say they planned to exit through Chiang Khong to Laos, would have been interesting to see how that went !
 

blackwolf

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Spotted a couple of small groups overlanders in Chiang Rai recently and spoke with a pair from Turkey, they had entered from Malaysia it was very late at night when they arrived in Chiang Rai and I pointed them to a place to stay, upon asking where the guide was they said they rode straight through the border control without any issues. So I guess it's another case of who is on the gate at the time, and if they give a toss if you have a permit or not, they went on to say they planned to exit through Chiang Khong to Laos, would have been interesting to see how that went !
Interesting. Although a strange number plate will stand out and the country you are departing from shouldn't let you proceed to Thailand unless you have the documents required for entry. In the same vein, Thai authorities won't let riders exit for Laos without showing evidence of having booked a tour except at the borders where this is not required (Nong Khai and Chiang Khong).

However, it could have been one of two things: 1) at the Malaysian border they are still quite lax. They normally don't see non-Thai, Malaysian or Singaporean vehicles hence this group may have "slipped through the cracks" still it's been almost 2 years since the rules went into effect, changing a couple of times in the process (first no guide needed, now one is needed but apparently there may be "loopholes" as you say). Also, you don't get out of your vehicle on the Malaysian side so the officials there may not have noticed their registrations before they proceeded to the Thai side. Same thing with temporary import forms - you often have to ask for them they aren't necessarily automatically given unlike at the Myanmar, Lao and Cambodian borders.

2) If they entered Thailand from Malaysia late at night then customs officials may have been on their way home and missed the guide requirement (or as you say, it could depend on the official on duty). As they were riding through Thailand, the police may not necessarily be familiar with the customs rules and assumed they were driving/riding legally through the country hence they weren't stopped. By contrast, foreign riders entering Vietnam from Laos at the one or two borders where they are/used to be lax were often later stopped by the police inside the country and they found themselves in difficulty. The Thai police however have a reputation for being lax and friendly, while the Vietnamese police can be rather authoritarian and go by the book.

Yes, I'm also curious as to what will happen or already happened to them at the Chiang Khong border. Back on page 12, you'll see the thread about what happened to the rider who got caught without a guide exiting at Chiang Khong last year who claimed no guide was needed.

Personally I'd like to see either an official document as to whether the rules have changed (although I doubt it) or actual testimonials of riders/drivers from third countries to see what their experiences were like - not much has been talked about Thailand's rules since the transfer of ownership of this forum from KTMPhil a few months ago. He is/was the main authority on crossing into Thailand with a foreign car/motorcycle on this forum.
 
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prince666

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Due to the uncertain rules in this matter, I have delayed trying to get my Chinese plated bike into Thailand without a guild.

Will make more inquiries with custom at Chiang Khong after I fly in on the 18th on June 2018.
Depending on what there say I will try and bring my bike in without a guild early October this year.
Until such time I can't report back first hand so to speak.


He is/was the main authority on crossing into Thailand with a foreign car/motorcycle on this forum.
Was it not the case that he had a vested interest in this matter as he used to charge big money for his services.
 
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blackwolf

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That would be great. Would like to see what customs says and how things go. Even if a guide isn't required (if so this would mean a change of policy back to the original one in effect from June 2016 to early 2017 where only a permit is required) there are still some costs involved as I recall a few thousand Baht.

I will also make enquiries at customs on my next trip to Laos by car in the next couple of weeks. However, you will likely beat me to it as my trip isn't for another 3-4 weeks.
 

prince666

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I will report back Blackwolf when I have more details.

I am hoping that because I have a full Thai DL may help.

We will just have to wait and see.
 

blackwolf

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I will report back Blackwolf when I have more details.

I am hoping that because I have a full Thai DL may help.

We will just have to wait and see.
Great, looking forward to it.

I forgot to mention I also have a trip to Cambodia (Siem Reap) coming up in the next few days, it's just for 3 days but I will have the opportunity to ask customs at 2-3 border posts. I am going to try entering at the new border crossing south of Aran called Ban Khao Din. If that border doesn't work for vehicle crossings entering Cambodia I'll ask what the situation is at Aran (inbound) and lastly at Chong Chom, where I will have to enter if I can't cross over at Ban Khao Din.

While in theory customs at all borders should be following the same rules, I suspect as was mentioned earlier it could depend on the official on duty and their interpretation of the rules. This seems to be the standard in the region, not just Thailand. There are far fewer vehicles crossing the Thai-Cambodian border therefore what customs tells me may not be as reliable as at the Lao border but I will nevertheless report back here what I've been told.

A Thai DL will certainly facilitate the process of bringing in a foreign vehicle but not sure if it helps to eliminate the guide requirement; in any case we will know soon enough.
 

blackwolf

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Due to the uncertain rules in this matter, I have delayed trying to get my Chinese plated bike into Thailand without a guild.

Will make more inquiries with custom at Chiang Khong after I fly in on the 18th on June 2018.
Depending on what there say I will try and bring my bike in without a guild early October this year.
Until such time I can't report back first hand so to speak.




Was it not the case that he had a vested interest in this matter as he used to charge big money for his services.
Indeed. Although that also makes sure he is very much up to date with the requirements.
 

prince666

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A Thai DL will certainly facilitate the process of bringing in a foreign vehicle but not sure if it helps to eliminate the guide requirement; in any case, we will know soon enough.
The main reason what started all these requirements, was the CHINESE?
After 10 years riding all over China, I know more than most how bad the riding standards are in China.
On top of that then there had to drive/ride on the other side of the road, which there never had to do before.
It was just a matter of time before the Thai government said "we need to stop this" hence the guide's rule???
So as I will be on a Chinese plated bike and that I am not the normal Chinese looking person and that I can show that I have a Thai DL.

Just maybe I can get in on the bike with no guides

The other item that may be handy to have is that when I an in CR in 10 days time, I am going to see if I can arrange some Thail bike insurance with some better cover then the normal 3rd party one.
which was a problem in the past.

So with a Thai DL good Thail insurance for the bike, my chances are better than most IMO.
 
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Snakeboy

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I am a member of several facebookgroups and different overlandtravel groups and forums. And there are and have been very many reports of international overland travellers who get into Thailand after the new rules that came in 2016 that requires foreign vehicles to have guides and permits without having guides and petmits. Most of them seem to get the usual TIP that allow them in the country for 30 days, and there have been reports that some even have extended their TIPs as well. The same way it was used to be before the new rules. Others have used a Carnet and got it stamped, and some odd treveller has even entered without any papers at all. Even huge campervans that are absolutely and totally forbidden into Thailand have entered and vot a TIP at several different borders.
And this have been both from Laos, Cambodia and Malaysia. It is worth mentioning that of course many has been denied too since they havent got any guide and permits, so there isnt so that everybody that rock up at a border will be let through. It is as usual in Thailand, enforcing of laws and rules are totally random.
The Mae Sot border from Myanmar have however not been letting any foreign plated vehicles in without guides and permits.

Here are the most used facebook group where overlanders share their experiences: Thailand - New regulation affecting overland travellers on foreign vehicle
 
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blackwolf

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As mentioned when KTMPhil was still active, the occasional campervan is allowed in under certain circumstances, the policy is not completely inflexible. In fact, in 2016 after the rules were changed I saw a European campervan heading west from Myawaddy, next to Mae Sot. KTMPhil later advised that this vehicle got a special permit to enter Thailand.

The facebook group you mentioned I was previously a member of, but no longer go there due to all the bickering and entitlement of some of the members there as well as lots of false information (and lots of talk about how to "cheat" the system). I recall several posts in that group about vehicles being allowed across after the new rules came into effect mainly in the first few weeks/couple months since not much information was forthcoming that the rules had changed and customs officials were flexible. Equally, at some border posts the officials weren't budging.

There is no doubt that all of the vehicles that have gotten through since then were likely due to the persistence of the travelers themselves armed with a "there must be a way" attitude. I am well aware that Thai customs still does not consistently follow it's own policies everywhere. In any case, myself and prince666 will soon have first hand information from customs. Me from possibly 3 different Cambodian border posts and later one Lao post and prince from another Lao post (Chiang Khong).

I still find it odd that vehicles can make it in without permits. For the most part, reports have been coming through on various fora and FB groups that travelers managed to enter without a guide but had a permit, some of whom later had trouble at the exit border. Without constantly repeating myself, this has already been mentioned countless times on this very thread (up until page 12).

However, since June 2016 I have seen very, very few foreign vehicles from third countries driving in Thailand so the policy clearly has been working. I would imagine the number of vehicles able to enter without either a guide or permit (or both) has been rather few. My work takes me around Thailand and I drive to Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar often - up until 2016 foreign vehicles were regularly spotted (especially Chinese) but I haven't seen one Chinese vehicle since April 2016 although there have reportedly been a couple of Chinese caravans with permit and guide since then. I generally only see Cambodian, Lao, Malaysian and Singaporean cars and bikes traveling in various parts of Thailand these days. I think there was one Indian car I saw driving from Mae Sot to Tak sometime last year.

Also, here is some information about crossing into and out of Malaysia that drivers should be aware of is the imminent requirement for a RFID chip:

Vehicle Entry Permit

Malaysia to issue vehicle entry tags next month

This will initially apply to Singaporean registrations and any other foreign registrations that enter Malaysia from Singapore (but for the time being, it will only apply to cars not motorcycles). The plan has been much delayed, but looks like it will go into effect shortly. Soon afterwards, all Thai vehicles and foreign registrations entering from Thailand will require such chips. Thai media had initially reported that tags have been required as of June 2017 but it obviously hasn't gone into effect yet.

Thailand plans to reciprocate according to this Bangkok Post article:
Govt set to charge foreign drivers for using Thai roads

However, I don't see it happening for some years yet. Highly unlikely to go into effect end of this year as mentioned in the article from Nov 28, 2017. I wonder whether third country vehicles that already need a permit (and guide) will be affected once this policy goes into force (again will only apply to car drivers at the beginning so riders will be exempted for at least the first few years). My guess is it will only apply to vehicles registered in neighboring countries that are exempt from the permit rules.
 
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blackwolf

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The main reason what started all these requirements, was the CHINESE?
After 10 years riding all over China, I know more than most how bad the riding standards are in China.
On top of that then there had to drive/ride on the other side of the road, which there never had to do before.
It was just a matter of time before the Thai government said "we need to stop this" hence the guide's rule???
So as I will be on a Chinese plated bike and that I am not the normal Chinese looking person and that I can show that I have a Thai DL.

Just maybe I can get in on the bike with no guides

The other item that may be handy to have is that when I an in CR in 10 days time, I am going to see if I can arrange some Thail bike insurance with some better cover then the normal 3rd party one.
which was a problem in the past.

So with a Thai DL good Thail insurance for the bike, my chances are better than most IMO.
Well, we will see as I stated in my previous reply. Speculation doesn't get us anywhere - however my hunch is that Lao customs won't allow you to exit without proof of a guide and permit if they see you're on a Chinese plated bike, no matter that you aren't Chinese. However, Chiang Khong customs will confirm that for you when you see them next week. Let's wait until then and within 3-4 days I'll be posting here about what customs at the Cambodian borders tell me.

Also, one of the requirements for entering Thailand is you MUST have a policy that covers you for damages up to 1 million Baht - a third party policy is not enough. This has also been mentioned on this very thread.

The other issue with Chinese drivers was their huge numbers - although the statistics showed "only" 9000 vehicles from China had entered Thailand in 2016 prior to the new rules going into effect, this was already more than during the entire year of 2015 (which showed around 6000 Chinese vehicles) and numbers were going up exponentially year on year especially since 2013. Imagine if the Thai government had done nothing, there could have easily been 20,000-30,000 coming this year. And maybe 50,000 next year. It would literally have been an invasion.

Poor driving standards and attitudes aside, the numbers coming in were beginning to become unsustainable and having a major impact on local communities, particularly in Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai provinces. Chinese drivers getting into accidents and paying only a small amount of compensation or fleeing to China to escape prosecution were all major stories at the time meanwhile Thai drivers were prevented from entering China altogether without permits and guides. This was a gross double standard and while I don't normally like to see the introduction of new restrictions of any kind, unless China were to grant greater reciprocity by allowing Thai vehicles in without needing to have guides and permits this needed to be done. It amazes me that Thailand actually allowed them in for the 6-7 years that they were coming and thus I support this policy mainly because there needs to be a level playing field.

Interestingly, even though there was ONLY a permit requirement and no guides were required for the first 8-9 months, the new policy stopped Chinese arrivals dead in their tracks. I am surprised no one was willing to pay the paltry 5000-7000 Baht for a permit to enter, which is a drop in the ocean compared to the thousands of dollars the Chinese demand from foreign vehicles entering their country hence why almost no one even attempts to drive their own vehicle to China. I can understand that since March 2017 when the guide policy went into effect because the cost of entering Thailand with your own vehicle then increased as much as 10-fold. Therefore, most Chinese drivers to Thailand were coming mainly because it was basically free - just pay 200 Baht to customs, don't even bother with insurance. They were essentially the overland version of "0 dollar tourists".

Overlanders from third countries are a tiny, tiny minority and in terms of yearly arrivals into Thailand could probably be counted on one hand (even before 2016) but it's hard to introduce one rule for the Chinese but still allow vehicles in from Switzerland or Russia or Australia or wherever. Such a policy would draw accusations of double standards from the Chinese and rightly so.
 
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prince666

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Your posts make a lot of sense, and like you I just disregard all the stuff I read on Facebook, but I do take note?
For our members on RA from what I and you can find out and post then our readers will take that as it is the facts?, and if my meeting with Chiang Khong custom pans out ok then as I said I will try and bring my Chinese plated bike over in October this year.
Even if I am successful I will not promise that on that day that's works for me will work for you?

The current Thai law is NO ENTRY WITHOUT A GUIDE? full stop.


The main reason I will try and arrange next week in CR some insurance for my Chinese bike is to make sure I have cover for the 1.000.000 THB needed.

On the point that you mention about Laos Customs may not even let me across the bridge? I have already considered that possibility and if the guys at Chiang Khong say yes no problem? then I hope to get a letter or a contact number/name just in case.
 

blackwolf

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Sure. Try to do what you can. All of what you're doing will greatly increase your chances. I'll be keen on reading what customs tells you and how things pan out for you.
 

blackwolf

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OK here is what I found out.

First of all, here is a summary of the rules (in Thai) from the DLT website https://www.dlt.go.th/th/public-news/view.php?_did=1224. The rules state quite clearly that a permit and guide is required in all cases except the following:

1) Lao, Malaysian and Singaporean registrations.
2) Vehicles entering under a bilateral agreement on government business, i.e. with permission granted by the Thai government.
3) Vehicles from Cambodia and Myanmar entering under the jurisdiction of a local customs authority.

It seems however that some lesser used border crossings known to be "easy going" may still allow some vehicles from third countries (not Chinese) to pass without either a tour guide or permit. This is probably a loophole in the regulations and may eventually be closed.

The information I was able to ascertain is as follows:

New Thai/Cambodian border crossing is out. Foreigners can't cross there yet, despite what media releases (in both Thai and English) have stated. Private vehicles can't cross in either direction either. Perhaps in a few months.

Chong Chom. Although very few third country vehicles cross here (except Malaysian registrations, which are allowed in everywhere) they told me that a European registered campervan made it across some 3 months back. That vehicle had a carnet and Thai customs officials seem to be OK with third country registrations as long as they are in possession of a carnet (if available) and the vehicle is registered in the drivers name AND it's a lone vehicle entering. Groups of multiple vehicles need a police or travel agency escort (how many constitutes a group is unclear, but probably 3 or 4 and above). They also told me NO Chinese vehicles "because they are horrible drivers!" So Chinese need a tour.
If this border is indeed a loophole in the regulations it's the ONLY Cambodian border I would recommend trying (either entering or exiting Cambodia). It's highly unlikely any other border will permit entry or exit as the Cambodian side won't let you in either (except here). O'Smach is also the only border without a gate when leaving, hence why it's easy to make it to the Thai side. Koh Kong probably won't let you enter or exit if you're not driving a Thai vehicle - in the unlikely event they will let you in your registration will be kept by customs and you will be told you can't leave Koh Kong province. Last year I observed one Malaysian car refused entry probably because the driver didn't bring his/her registration along. Or because he told customs he was intending on traveling beyond Koh Kong province. Other Malaysian vehicles had their registrations held by customs. Reports on various fora seem to indicate that Koh Kong is becoming stricter.

Aranyaprathet/Poipet. Absolutely no entry into Thailand without a permit and guide. Head of customs knew the rules off by heart. Only Malaysian, Singaporean and Lao vehicles can enter without a tour. Cambodian vehicles ONLY allowed to drive around Aranyaprathet. Unless they are on a tour, in which case they can drive around the country. This border crossing is mainly used by trucks and buses as part of a bilateral agreement. This bilateral agreement does not cover private vehicles.

I don't like your chances of succeeding at Chiang Khong on a Chinese bike because it's the Chinese that prompted these rules in the first place and being a Chinese registration, it will be subjected to more scrutiny than other 3rd country registrations. However, you will find out when you ask Chiang Khong customs. As is usual in Thailand, the official rules and the rules on the ground are not always the same.
 
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prince666

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Thank you Blackwolf for your time in this matter.
In kumming hotel now waiting for my flight to leave on Monday.
Give me a few days then I will pop down to Chiang khong.
Now I am hoping that I have crossed this border about 10 times now on a Chinese plated bike, and the guys know me by now.
Also I am taking a local well contacted bike riders with me.
If I have the 1.000.000 THB insurance sorted out and with the fact I have full Thai DL and have a Thail big bike in my name.
My chances are slim to good IMO.

Last year the Chiang khong custom had a big open day .
I have pictures of my and the local bike club with the head of custom.
Will soon find out.
 

blackwolf

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OK. Looking forward to your report on here in a few days. When was the last time you entered Thailand on your Chinese plated bike?
 

Rick Bechard

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What happens if you import the bike, then decide not to export it? Customs website says you have to pay standard duties when clearing customs. These are forfeited if you don't export it. Is this the case? If so, can you sell the bike to a local?
 

bsacbob

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Rick, First of all, welcome to Ride Asia. The import route can be clouded as most people give up on the idea because of the huge charges they level on imports (as much as 70% of the retail value).

My understanding is once you have gone through the procedure of customs you will then need to produce it to the Land Transport office in Bangkok for emission testing which in itself is a very expensive process and when successful the machine can then be registered in the normal way and resold with no problem.
 

Rick Bechard

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Rick, First of all, welcome to Ride Asia. The import route can be clouded as most people give up on the idea because of the huge charges they level on imports (as much as 70% of the retail value).

My understanding is once you have gone through the procedure of customs you will then need to produce it to the Land Transport office in Bangkok for emission testing which in itself is a very expensive process and when successful the machine can then be registered in the normal way and resold.

Thanks for the welcome. Currently have import approval for my bike under my retirement visa. Hasn't arrived yet, so see how customs goes. My wife pretty connected.
My question was more what if a friend were to temporarily import a bike on a tourist visa, but did not take it out at the end of his trip. i.e. sells it to me.
 

bill

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Rick, most interested to hear how you go importing your bike under your retirement visa.
Are there any sources you can link to that detail the process ?
 

bsacbob

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I think the same applies, your friend's bike is only temporary imported so you will have to go through the whole process as above, whether the bike can already be in the country is tricky to say the least because of all the changes in the procedure of riding a bike through Thailand with guides etc.

Accumulated charges for overstay could also play a part of the bike has been in the country for a while, my advice would be unless it's a super rare model you have fallen in love with, walk away, the bike market is already flooded out with cheap bikes.
 

Rick Bechard

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Rick, most interested to hear how you go importing your bike under your retirement visa.
Are there any sources you can link to that detail the process ?
I started with this customs website.
Thai Customs

I was in Melbourne Australia at the time. My wife (Thai) made a couple of phones calls to customs. One guy did try to tell her that there was a 300% duty. Another call got her to a woman who basically said bullshit. She emailed me the calculation formula for the various taxes. The top duty rate is 80% of CIF (cost + insurance + freight). The website mentions discounts to the value (cost) based on how long you have owned the vehicle.
You first have to get the import approval from the Department of Commerce in BKK. You must go in personally to do this. Bring someone savvy in Thai with you. I had to jump through a few hoops because I was not prepared. But here is what I ended up having to provide:
* Passport with minimum 12 month visa.
* Vehicle registration history. Must show minimum 18 months ownership in your name. Alternately, 2 or more years registration certificates will suffice. I got a report from the roads department. I had to print and sign it and send by mail. Then had to forward the email I got from the roads dept., just to prove I did not make up the report myself.
* License history, also from the roads department. I had just renewed my license and they would not accept that I had had one for 18 months before the new one. Again, if you have saved old licenses those would suffice. Again, print, sign, mail and forward email.
* Invoice to show value, but when I gave it to them, they really didn't accept it. I had to go to the internet and download a price guide from NADA. It was a lower value than I gave them, so they accepted my value. haha. Now this value is for the import paperwork only, the final value for duties is decided in customs.
* Photo of the bike. Simple.

Long story short, have all this information together before you go. Plan for a day in BKK to fill out the paperwork. Bring a savvy Thai with you cause the forms are in Thai and they are not supposed to help you. Stay calm outside, it not inside as well. After you submit the application, you will get an email or phone call from the person who you dealt with. Maybe all is in order, maybe they request more documentation. My impression is, they are up on any scams or dodgy documents and it will only complicate things. Once all is approved by the manager of the office, you will be asked to return to BKK to fill out more paperwork to get the approval which is in the form of a plastic card with your photo and file number. This allows you to pickup your vehicle from customs. I think. This took another day.

Bike should ship from Australia this week along with household goods. You can only bring one bike, (I have 2) so I picked the one I love the most.

I expect to do the customs in 4 weeks or so. In preparation, I have downloaded ads showing prices for the same year bike from Facebook for sale pages. I have also downloaded a report from Hagerty.com, showing prices for bikes in similar years. This is so as to not leave it up to customs to set the value. If you have some documentation showing applicable prices, they should at least be close to that. This I got from a manager at customs.

I will update on the final outcome later.
 

Rick Bechard

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I think the same applies, your friend's bike is only temporary imported so you will have to go through the whole process as above, whether the bike can already be in the country is tricky to say the least because of all the changes in the procedure of riding a bike through Thailand with guides etc.

Accumulated charges for overstay could also play a part of the bike has been in the country for a while, my advice would be unless it's a super rare model you have fallen in love with, walk away, the bike market is already flooded out with cheap bikes.
Just to clarify my question. I am permanently importing my bike from Australia. That I have sorted out. The thai customs website indicates that temporary import requires the same steps, (unless you ride it across a border) for instance, documentation and payment of a bond in the amount of standard duties which would apply for the permanent import. Then, if the bike is not exported at the end of the time allowed, the duties are forfeited. What I want to know is if a friend brought a bike in on a temporary basis, then rather than export it, sold it to me, is this permitted as the duties have been paid.
 

bill

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2011
Location
Cambodia
Bikes
KTM 500 XCW
I started with this customs website.
Thai Customs

I was in Melbourne Australia at the time. My wife (Thai) made a couple of phones calls to customs. One guy did try to tell her that there was a 300% duty. Another call got her to a woman who basically said bullshit. She emailed me the calculation formula for the various taxes. The top duty rate is 80% of CIF (cost + insurance + freight). The website mentions discounts to the value (cost) based on how long you have owned the vehicle.
You first have to get the import approval from the Department of Commerce in BKK. You must go in personally to do this. Bring someone savvy in Thai with you. I had to jump through a few hoops because I was not prepared. But here is what I ended up having to provide:
* Passport with minimum 12 month visa.
* Vehicle registration history. Must show minimum 18 months ownership in your name. Alternately, 2 or more years registration certificates will suffice. I got a report from the roads department. I had to print and sign it and send by mail. Then had to forward the email I got from the roads dept., just to prove I did not make up the report myself.
* License history, also from the roads department. I had just renewed my license and they would not accept that I had had one for 18 months before the new one. Again, if you have saved old licenses those would suffice. Again, print, sign, mail and forward email.
* Invoice to show value, but when I gave it to them, they really didn't accept it. I had to go to the internet and download a price guide from NADA. It was a lower value than I gave them, so they accepted my value. haha. Now this value is for the import paperwork only, the final value for duties is decided in customs.
* Photo of the bike. Simple.

Long story short, have all this information together before you go. Plan for a day in BKK to fill out the paperwork. Bring a savvy Thai with you cause the forms are in Thai and they are not supposed to help you. Stay calm outside, it not inside as well. After you submit the application, you will get an email or phone call from the person who you dealt with. Maybe all is in order, maybe they request more documentation. My impression is, they are up on any scams or dodgy documents and it will only complicate things. Once all is approved by the manager of the office, you will be asked to return to BKK to fill out more paperwork to get the approval which is in the form of a plastic card with your photo and file number. This allows you to pickup your vehicle from customs. I think. This took another day.

Bike should ship from Australia this week along with household goods. You can only bring one bike, (I have 2) so I picked the one I love the most.

I expect to do the customs in 4 weeks or so. In preparation, I have downloaded ads showing prices for the same year bike from Facebook for sale pages. I have also downloaded a report from Hagerty.com, showing prices for bikes in similar years. This is so as to not leave it up to customs to set the value. If you have some documentation showing applicable prices, they should at least be close to that. This I got from a manager at customs.

I will update on the final outcome later.
Great info Rick, look forward to hearing about the final outcome.
I have a rare Ducati GT1000 registered in Cambodia and would love to import it to Thailand if I decide to relocate there on the retirement visa.
The alternative would be to do it on temp import for up to 6 months per year.
If it wasnt a rare bike, I wouldn't bother and whole heartedly agree its easier to just buy in Thailand.
 

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