Bring own bike from Germany to SEA

Transalp

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Jan 3, 2019
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Honda Transalp
Hi all,

I am new in this forum and want to start my first thread.

My dream is to do a huge adventure - Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar, Bhutan, Nepal - back to Thailand, Lao, Cambiodia etc. etc ...
I am self employed and can do this trip step by step - always 4 weeks, but I have to leave my bike in the dedicated country.

Therefore I would like to ship my well equipped Honda Transalp from Germany to Singapore and start from there. First stop should be BKK.

Now I learned that it is very difficult to leave my bike in Thailand, Myanmar etc. while I go back to Germany.

Thank you for your advice.

P.S.: I am very experienced in SEA - and also experienced with big bikes.

Cheers Michael
 

bsacbob

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Michael,
A warm welcome to the forum, crossing borders in SEA has changed dramatically in the last few years and each crossing comes with its own set of problems.

Entering Myanmar from Thailand you will need a guide and usually a government official also, the cheapest way is to hook up with other riders and share the cost or join a tour group.

Entering into Thailand from whatever entry point is similar although many reports of riders entering Thailand from Malaysia with no issues and no need for a guide or paperwork, this may well appear to be fine the issue will be when you come to exit the country. You may see on social media sites several rider friendly sites that claim to be able to get riders through Thailand without guides or paperwork, I would be extremely wary of such claims.

If you plan to stay in Thailand for a period of time the best way is to hire a bike and you have the freedom to travel to Laos and Cambodia but may have to pay some additional fee's the cover the hire company of risk, also there are some issues taking any bike into Laos at the moment depending on your entry point.
 

Transalp

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Jan 3, 2019
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Germany
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Honda Transalp
Thank you so much,

yes I guess I would be busy with managing a lot of border problems.
My biker friends in Singapore told me, that it is no problem to enter Malaysia and Thailand - the problem will come up, when I am leaving Thailand without my bike ...
I have a "carnet de passage" etc. - but the main problem is tax issue I guess.

Ok - anyhow I will start my trip without my own bike :cry: mid of March 2019 to explore North Thailand, golden triangle etc. with a rental bike.

Maye other members can give me a feedback.
 

Snakeboy

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Honda Crf 250L 2012, Yamaha XT660Z Tenere 2011
Bringing in a bike from overseas to south-east Asia shouldnt be too hard, but of course a bit costly.
The problems start when you want to cross borders. Singapore and Malaysia shouldnt be too hard if you have a Carnet and insurance.

Thailand introduced new laws and regulations in 2016 for foreign vehicles making it mandatory with excessive permits and mandatory guides to enter the kingdom and travel within it. However as of lately it seems from the many reports I have been reading on different travellers forums that it is relatively easy to get into Thailand without the mandatory permits and guides through most bordercrossings except the Mae Sot - Myawaddy bordercrossings between Thailand and Myanmar. They seem to still enforce the rules with mandatory permits and guides.
So upon entering Thailand without guides and permits one should be given the 30 day TVIP as was the norm before. But for you this will cause a problem - how will you enter Thailand, find a place to safely park and store youre bike, fly back home, do your things back home, fly back to Thailand, pick up your bike and ride it across a border within those 30 days TVIP allowance you got when you entered the country?
That said - I have heard of travellers who have gotten both 60 and 90 days on their TVIP, but that seem to be more luck than visdom...

Leaving a bike for 4 weeks - I guess would be easiest in Malaysia or Cambodia. In Malaysia on a Carnet and in Cambodia some borders dont issue any TVIP or other documents so I guess one can have the bike there as long as one want(?)
Thailand would be problematic more than 30 days, the same with Laos. Myanmar would be impossible.
Laos and Cambodia do also to some extend make it troublesome to enter their countries on a foreign bike - but it should be ok if one do the homework before one try to enter these countries.

Myanmar - mandatory guides and permits are required! No way around that for the moment. Best to do it in a group to get the costs low. I have seen 7-10 day crossings as low as 6-700 USD including guides and permits and accomodation. So it isnt that extremely costly but still a bit...

Bhutan - I have travelled Bhutan on a bike but that was on a arranged group tour. Beautiful country indeed - but as far as I remember you can only ride in Bhutan through an pre arranged group tour and guides were mandatory back then. Its possible this have changed by now as the tour I did was some 7-8 years back in time. But I doubt this ad I havent heard of many single riders travelling in Bhutan.

Another option is to buy a bike in Thailand or Malaysia. Its possible, in Thailand it just takes a sertificate of recidency and some time and the bike is yours legally. And with thai plates it could be stored as long as you want. You should relatively easily be able to travel Malaysia, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia on it. If you get a Carnet for it you can also do Myanmar, India, Nepal etc. Maybe all the way to your home country...🙂
 

Transalp

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Jan 3, 2019
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Germany
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Honda Transalp
Thank you for that information - guess I have to change my plans and do plan B, meaning rent or buy a bike in Thailand.

Do you have an idea how much a new/ used Transalp is in Thailand?
 

Snakeboy

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Honda Crf 250L 2012, Yamaha XT660Z Tenere 2011
I dont think Transalps have ever been sold new in Thailand - afaik at least. Maybe other more experienced expat riders can chime in with some information?
If you want a Honda Adv/touring type of bike the Cb500X is made in Thailand and thus easy available and so is the Nx750 I belive(?)
Dont know the price for a new one but a slightly used Cb500X is sold for around 150-170 000 baht = 4100-4650 €.
There is also many Suzuki V-Stroms available in Thailand, the slightly used 650s cc seem to be sold for around 200-220 000 baht = 5,500-6000 €.
Plenty of Kawasaki Versys 650 also, they seem to sell even cheaper used nowadays.
 

The Bigfella

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Some of the border crossings are easy, others not so. I was using Chiang Mai as a base for my riding for six years before buying Rider's Corner in Chiang Mai. We rent bikes - but not Transalps. One of our DRZ400s crossed into Laos today with a Spanish couple, we had a CRF250 and a DRZ400 go in about three weeks ago with a German couple - who raved about the experience. They loved it and thought the DRZ was the perfect bike for Laos - they also did the Mae Hong Son loop with it - "best ride I have ever done".... but that was before they went to Laos. - and the guy who said that is a former German motorcycling journalist. We do Honda 500s as well.... but I know what I'd take to Laos. We have an American and a British couple staying with us tonight... and they are here for extended riding seasons.
 

The Bigfella

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KTM 950Super Enduro R, KTM 525(613)EXC, BMW R90S, BMW 650 Dakar, 2 x Postie bikes (CT110s), MZ250, BSA B31/33, Norton 16H, 2 x Honda CB500F, Honda ...
Sure: www.riderscorner.net Still doing updates to the "shop" section, but you will get the idea. Rental bikes at present include Fino, Wave, Forza, Lifan Cross 200, Honda 250s in XR, XL and CRF, Honda CB500F (probably CB500X in a week or so too) and Suzuki DRZ400.
 

blackwolf

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Mar 7, 2014
Bikes
Honda Sonic 125cc, 4 wheels, about to buy a 250cc dirt bike
Bringing in a bike from overseas to south-east Asia shouldnt be too hard, but of course a bit costly.
The problems start when you want to cross borders. Singapore and Malaysia shouldnt be too hard if you have a Carnet and insurance.

Thailand introduced new laws and regulations in 2016 for foreign vehicles making it mandatory with excessive permits and mandatory guides to enter the kingdom and travel within it. However as of lately it seems from the many reports I have been reading on different travellers forums that it is relatively easy to get into Thailand without the mandatory permits and guides through most bordercrossings except the Mae Sot - Myawaddy bordercrossings between Thailand and Myanmar. They seem to still enforce the rules with mandatory permits and guides.
So upon entering Thailand without guides and permits one should be given the 30 day TVIP as was the norm before. But for you this will cause a problem - how will you enter Thailand, find a place to safely park and store youre bike, fly back home, do your things back home, fly back to Thailand, pick up your bike and ride it across a border within those 30 days TVIP allowance you got when you entered the country?
That said - I have heard of travellers who have gotten both 60 and 90 days on their TVIP, but that seem to be more luck than visdom...

Leaving a bike for 4 weeks - I guess would be easiest in Malaysia or Cambodia. In Malaysia on a Carnet and in Cambodia some borders dont issue any TVIP or other documents so I guess one can have the bike there as long as one want(?)
Thailand would be problematic more than 30 days, the same with Laos. Myanmar would be impossible.
Laos and Cambodia do also to some extend make it troublesome to enter their countries on a foreign bike - but it should be ok if one do the homework before one try to enter these countries.

Myanmar - mandatory guides and permits are required! No way around that for the moment. Best to do it in a group to get the costs low. I have seen 7-10 day crossings as low as 6-700 USD including guides and permits and accomodation. So it isnt that extremely costly but still a bit...

Bhutan - I have travelled Bhutan on a bike but that was on a arranged group tour. Beautiful country indeed - but as far as I remember you can only ride in Bhutan through an pre arranged group tour and guides were mandatory back then. Its possible this have changed by now as the tour I did was some 7-8 years back in time. But I doubt this ad I havent heard of many single riders travelling in Bhutan.

Another option is to buy a bike in Thailand or Malaysia. Its possible, in Thailand it just takes a sertificate of recidency and some time and the bike is yours legally. And with thai plates it could be stored as long as you want. You should relatively easily be able to travel Malaysia, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia on it. If you get a Carnet for it you can also do Myanmar, India, Nepal etc. Maybe all the way to your home country...🙂
I would like to add a few details. Although the rules on transiting Thailand with a 3rd country registration have been in force since 2016 and some travellers have managed to get their vehicles in despite the rules (as long as their vehicle isn't Chinese registered) it's a bit of a hit and miss and depends on the border crossing and officials involved and could change again at anytime without notice. I think the proposed linking of customs, immigration and the land transport department to track foreign vehicles entering Thailand via the Thailand Travel App or whatever it's called hasn't happened yet, hence why officials at some crossings are still lax. Once they manage to successfully implement everything, I expect the authorities will be consistent at all borders, but this could take some time.

I have asked at various borders and the concensus is - Aranyaprathet/Poipet is definitely impossible without a permit, while the Lao crossings such as Ban Nakraseng-Kaenthao (Tha Li, Loei) and Chiang Khong-Huay Xai essentially also said something similar. However, I have to admit I didn't specifically ask about motorcycles, only cars. Thai and Lao officials don't really like motorcycles crossing the Friendship Bridges although FB4 in Chiang Khong is OK with it provided you hire a lead vehicle to guide you across the bridge (which Thai officials will insist upon).

I second the motion that the OP buy a bike in Thailand and go from there.
 

Transalp

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Honda Transalp
@blackwolf: Thank you very much.
I have the impression that there is a lot a stress to manage everything with my own (german registered) bike.

Finally I will rent a bike in Chiang Mai and will explore the northern part of Thailand. The plan is to cross northern border to Laos, riding down south to Vientiane and crossing the border again to Thailand. Do you think that is possible?
 

bill

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KTM 500 XCW
I was talking to a European gent yesterday, here in Cambodia. He was riding a hire bike from Vietnam which he said he had no problems bringing it into Cambodia and Laos. The Viet Laos crossing was at Lao Bao. I didn't ask where he entered Cambodia but I suspect also from Vietnam, not Laos.
Once he returns it to the hire company in Vietnam he plans to fly to Chiang Mai and hire a bike there to tour around Nth Thailand
Too easy.
 

Snakeboy

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Honda Crf 250L 2012, Yamaha XT660Z Tenere 2011
@blackwolf: Thank you very much.
I have the impression that there is a lot a stress to manage everything with my own (german registered) bike.

Finally I will rent a bike in Chiang Mai and will explore the northern part of Thailand. The plan is to cross northern border to Laos, riding down south to Vientiane and crossing the border again to Thailand. Do you think that is possible?
As long as you rent a bike at a bike rental company that allows you to take their bike through the border and give you the necessary paperwork for entering Laos it should be possible.
But you have to ask the rental company first of course and make sure they give you the documents needed to cross borders.
 

The Bigfella

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KTM 950Super Enduro R, KTM 525(613)EXC, BMW R90S, BMW 650 Dakar, 2 x Postie bikes (CT110s), MZ250, BSA B31/33, Norton 16H, 2 x Honda CB500F, Honda ...
As long as you rent a bike at a bike rental company that allows you to take their bike through the border and give you the necessary paperwork for entering Laos it should be possible.
But you have to ask the rental company first of course and make sure they give you the documents needed to cross borders.
The paperwork for a rental bike crossing is significant. I didn't do an exact count, but it has been in the order of 15 pages each time we send a bike... all of which has to be signed / written in blue ink, etc... and the original green book (not a copy) has to go with the bike. Many rental companies simply won't do it. We do it, but we need to have a little bit (more is better) of notice, so we can book in with the lady who knows the ropes. She is an expert at it. We have another DRZ in Laos at present.

As a matter of interest, I heard today that one of the major rental companies here is stopping rentals of dirt bikes, because they get too banged up. I can't confirm that yet... but I can believe it. They always get funny about scratches on plastics, etc. We had one of ours come back recently minus an indicator. Our repair cost to the renter was $11. I've heard stories of some companies charging many times that.....
 

Transalp

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Honda Transalp
@Bigfella: Thank you for your update - important for me is to ride from Norththailand to Laos.
 

blackwolf

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Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Bikes
Honda Sonic 125cc, 4 wheels, about to buy a 250cc dirt bike
@blackwolf: Thank you very much.
I have the impression that there is a lot a stress to manage everything with my own (german registered) bike.

Finally I will rent a bike in Chiang Mai and will explore the northern part of Thailand. The plan is to cross northern border to Laos, riding down south to Vientiane and crossing the border again to Thailand. Do you think that is possible?
Sounds like a good plan. Should be possible as long as you cross into Laos from Chiang Khong.
 

bikesncats

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Sihanoulville
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XTZ660 Ténéré, XJ900 diversion
@blackwolf: Thank you very much.
I have the impression that there is a lot a stress to manage everything with my own (german registered) bike.

Finally I will rent a bike in Chiang Mai and will explore the northern part of Thailand. The plan is to cross northern border to Laos, riding down south to Vientiane and crossing the border again to Thailand. Do you think that is possible?
If its a transalp you want...or for convenience for that matter, i suggest you fly to Phom Penh, buy a transalp or africa twin which are common (making sure you din't buy a khmerized model, easy to spot by electrical cables lol). Make sure its a bike with tax papers, you register it in your name and make it travel ready (Russian market in PP has everything you coud possibly need). This process should only take a few days...once done you're free to travel throughout Vietnam, Laos Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore with the regular temprary import papers. Having said that, you will however have to leave these countries within the time allowed WITH the bike. If your regular trip length allows for you to head back to cambodia at the end of every trip this is in my opinion the cheapest and safest way to proceed. To store your bike i can give you couple of bike shops that will do that for you at minimal charge. Outside the box motorcycles in Siem Reap is one good example.
Just as a side note, last year in may i was refused entry into thailand with my swiss registerred bike (with carnet), after living over 10 years there full time...never had an issue with my cambodian registerred bike BUT it needs to be registerred in your name and laws in cambodia now prevent foregneirs from transferring registerred bike so you need to buy a new bike or a secind hand bike with tax papers, both are plentiful and cheaper then in thailand. Cheers.
 

blackwolf

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Mar 7, 2014
Bikes
Honda Sonic 125cc, 4 wheels, about to buy a 250cc dirt bike
If its a transalp you want...or for convenience for that matter, i suggest you fly to Phom Penh, buy a transalp or africa twin which are common (making sure you din't buy a khmerized model, easy to spot by electrical cables lol). Make sure its a bike with tax papers, you register it in your name and make it travel ready (Russian market in PP has everything you coud possibly need). This process should only take a few days...once done you're free to travel throughout Vietnam, Laos Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore with the regular temprary import papers. Having said that, you will however have to leave these countries within the time allowed WITH the bike. If your regular trip length allows for you to head back to cambodia at the end of every trip this is in my opinion the cheapest and safest way to proceed. To store your bike i can give you couple of bike shops that will do that for you at minimal charge. Outside the box motorcycles in Siem Reap is one good example.
Just as a side note, last year in may i was refused entry into thailand with my swiss registerred bike (with carnet), after living over 10 years there full time...never had an issue with my cambodian registerred bike BUT it needs to be registerred in your name and laws in cambodia now prevent foregneirs from transferring registerred bike so you need to buy a new bike or a secind hand bike with tax papers, both are plentiful and cheaper then in thailand. Cheers.
Good advice, just a few points/questions. Doesn't Singapore require a carnet for non-Malaysian/non-Thai vehicles? That's what it says on their customs website. Never heard of a Cambodian bike (or car for that matter) seeking entry to, let alone being allowed to enter Singapore. Probably isn't worth the hassle anyway, for such a small country. Also wondering if the same applies to Malaysia but they are probably more flexible, if you arrive overland. Again, I haven't heard of a Cambodian vehicle ever entering Malaysia but perhaps you have done it or know someone who has.

Despite not being consistent in it's enforcement (which depends on the border/official on duty), Thailand since 2016 has implemented new rules for foreign cars and motorcycles seeking to enter the country, hence why you were refused because you didn't have the necessary permits/guide. Once the planned linking of customs, immigration and the land transport department has been completed it's likely that the current loopholes will be closed but it's anyone's guess how long this will take - could be years! Whether or not you lived there for 10 years has nothing to do with whether or not you will be allowed to bring a Swiss registered bike into Thailand. That's a customs matter.

For Cambodian bikes entering Thailand, in theory you aren't supposed to leave the border province entered, in practice you can go where you want. However, it's unclear whether you must head back through the same crossing you entered but you definitely can't go in or out via Aranyaprathet/Poipet with a Cambodian vehicle (vehicles granted entry are only permitted to travel around Aranyaprathet district), they are very strict there. Read about a guy who tried re-entering Cambodia on his Cambo registered bike there after having entered Thailand at Chong Chom/O'Smach - was refused and he had to go back the same way he came. Additionally, immigration at Aran is strict with foreigners so unless you're a legal Thai resident with proper visa or a citizen of an ASEAN country I wouldn't pass through that border.

Haven't heard of Cambodian bikes entering Vietnam (other than small ones driven by locals within the border areas) but you can always try. My understanding is Cambodian registrations (cars and motorcycles) if permitted entry are supposed to be restricted to the border areas. I'd be careful about going too far as the police can be quite strict in Vietnam. Lao registrations are fine to drive throughout the country. Just a word of advice knowing that the Vietnamese police are not as easygoing as say their Thai counterparts.
 

bikesncats

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Good advice, just a few points/questions. Doesn't Singapore require a carnet for non-Malaysian/non-Thai vehicles? That's what it says on their customs website. Never heard of a Cambodian bike (or car for that matter) seeking entry to, let alone being allowed to enter Singapore. Probably isn't worth the hassle anyway, for such a small country. Also wondering if the same applies to Malaysia but they are probably more flexible, if you arrive overland. Again, I haven't heard of a Cambodian vehicle ever entering Malaysia but perhaps you have done it or know someone who has.

Despite not being consistent in it's enforcement (which depends on the border/official on duty), Thailand since 2016 has implemented new rules for foreign cars and motorcycles seeking to enter the country, hence why you were refused because you didn't have the necessary permits/guide. Once the planned linking of customs, immigration and the land transport department has been completed it's likely that the current loopholes will be closed but it's anyone's guess how long this will take - could be years! Whether or not you lived there for 10 years has nothing to do with whether or not you will be allowed to bring a Swiss registered bike into Thailand. That's a customs matter.

For Cambodian bikes entering Thailand, in theory you aren't supposed to leave the border province entered, in practice you can go where you want. However, it's unclear whether you must head back through the same crossing you entered but you definitely can't go in or out via Aranyaprathet/Poipet with a Cambodian vehicle (vehicles granted entry are only permitted to travel around Aranyaprathet district), they are very strict there. Read about a guy who tried re-entering Cambodia on his Cambo registered bike there after having entered Thailand at Chong Chom/O'Smach - was refused and he had to go back the same way he came. Additionally, immigration at Aran is strict with foreigners so unless you're a legal Thai resident with proper visa or a citizen of an ASEAN country I wouldn't pass through that border.

Haven't heard of Cambodian bikes entering Vietnam (other than small ones driven by locals within the border areas) but you can always try. My understanding is Cambodian registrations (cars and motorcycles) if permitted entry are supposed to be restricted to the border areas. I'd be careful about going too far as the police can be quite strict in Vietnam. Lao registrations are fine to drive throughout the country. Just a word of advice knowing that the Vietnamese police are not as easygoing as say their Thai counterparts.
Its very well possible that laws have changed and customs adopt them slowly, from what i've seen in thailand over tge years it happens more often then menstruating women change their underware.
Personally i haven't been in Malaysa or Singapore with a Camdian registerred bike (only thai registerred which was no problem at all) but i know of a couple guys from PP who have done it several times. They had to get the temp import papers and buy insurance. Same with Thailand actually.
I couldn't do the thai border entry because i had already been overland twice in the same year....so beware as a farang even with a vehicle that rule applies.
I also have not been made aware that anyone entering thailand is restricted to the border province. In fact one of my friends goes regularly to bangkok (through poi pet/aranyaprathet) with his bike and has so far only been refused entry once but it seems it had something to do with new years...
Vietnam also will require the bike to be in your name, temp import papers and insurance for the rest no issues even for barangs residing in cambodia. Things may change in the future but so far its been working.
In the end the least hassle if theze new rules get applied would be to rent a bike in each country upon arrival.
 

Transalp

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Jan 3, 2019
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Germany
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Honda Transalp
Hi,

thank you all for your help and very good advices.

I changed my plans and will leave my Transalp here in Germany - wonderful trips to Blackwood Forest and France, Austria and Swisserland this summer.

But - I will rent a Honda 500 X in Chiang Mai to do my trip to North Thailand and Laos - 4.500 km I guess. Starting mid of March this year.

After that I think about to export my german transalp to Cambodia and do the next step of my long ride. Maybe I can get help ...

Once again, thank you all very much.

Cheers Michael
 

blackwolf

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Mar 7, 2014
Bikes
Honda Sonic 125cc, 4 wheels, about to buy a 250cc dirt bike
Its very well possible that laws have changed and customs adopt them slowly, from what i've seen in thailand over tge years it happens more often then menstruating women change their underware.
Personally i haven't been in Malaysa or Singapore with a Camdian registerred bike (only thai registerred which was no problem at all) but i know of a couple guys from PP who have done it several times. They had to get the temp import papers and buy insurance. Same with Thailand actually.
I couldn't do the thai border entry because i had already been overland twice in the same year....so beware as a farang even with a vehicle that rule applies.
I also have not been made aware that anyone entering thailand is restricted to the border province. In fact one of my friends goes regularly to bangkok (through poi pet/aranyaprathet) with his bike and has so far only been refused entry once but it seems it had something to do with new years...
Vietnam also will require the bike to be in your name, temp import papers and insurance for the rest no issues even for barangs residing in cambodia. Things may change in the future but so far its been working.
In the end the least hassle if theze new rules get applied would be to rent a bike in each country upon arrival.
Immigration and customs are separate issues. Aranyaprathet is a no-no when it comes to bringing a car or bike. You are restricted to Aranyaprathet district. I asked the head customs guy when I re-entered the country there last year and he was adamant about this. This applies since 2016. If your friend passed through there prior to June 2016 he might have been in luck but now I would advise against entries that way especially if you're coming with a car or bike for two reasons: 1) immigration often refuses entry to foreigners without visas who have spent a lot of time in Thailand/made many entries 2) because legally, you can't drive further than Aranyaprathet. Of course, 2 entries per calendar year without a visa also applies at all land border crossings.

If you enter somewhere else, such as Ban Pakkard, then no issues. I found Ban Pakkard to be quite fussy with all the different procedures when you enter - like park your car (or bike) in the proper place before the barrier, get your passport stamped, return your passenger manifest, then drive your vehicle across the barrier, park it then return the customs form to the customs booth (this was for a Thai registered vehicle). Immigration also asks some questions, but they'll let you in. Although my Vietnamese friend, who is no regular visitor to Thailand and was using a new passport with no Thai stamps in it was questioned at length about his travel plans before they stamped him in. As a Cambodian resident, your friend probably won't have any problems there, but just wanted to give you a heads up.

Vietnam. They definitely don't like foreigners driving cars into their country. I was refused entry from Laos driving a Lao car in 2012. Strange reasons given for refusal though I was permitted entry 8 months earlier. In 2017, I was abused by a Viet customs officer at Moc Bai (the main crossing between Ho Chi Minh and Phnom Penh) and forced to let my friend drive the measly 50m to park. I think they are OK with foreigners riding motorcycles, but not sure how they treat barang riding Cambodian bikes across the border. Don't think many try - but I guess if you're the legal owner of the bike you should be OK. Foreigners wanting to ride Vietnam should consider buying a VN plated bike and then touring Cambodia and Laos, not the other way round.
 

bill

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Cambodia
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KTM 500 XCW
Foreigners wanting to ride Vietnam should consider buying a VN plated bike and then touring Cambodia and Laos, not the other way round.
Correct.
I've seen plenty of backpackers doing this in Laos and Cambodia. Viet made Honda Wins are a popular choice, and I previously mentioned a foreigner doing it on a Viet registered 250 dirt bike that he hired.
It could be problematic crossing from Laos to Cambodia on a Viet bike though. You might have to backtrack into Vietnam from Laos, then cross into Cambodia at a Viet/Cambo border.
 

Snakeboy

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Or simply rent a bike in Vietnam. I saw a guy who had rented a bike at a rental company called Tigit motorbike rental in Vietnam and he said he took the bike into both Laos and Cambodia with a little tea money spent to get into Cambo though.

I checked Tigit netside and I have to say it was really impressing. Many different models and absolutely reasonably prices. And you can rent in Hanoi and ride it to HCM and leave it there. And opposit too of course. They even had a third office somewhere in the middle.
 

bill

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Cambodia
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KTM 500 XCW
Or simply rent a bike in Vietnam. I saw a guy who had rented a bike at a rental company called Tigit motorbike rental in Vietnam and he said he took the bike into both Laos and Cambodia with a little tea money spent to get into Cambo though.

I checked Tigit netside and I have to say it was really impressing. Many different models and absolutely reasonably prices. And you can rent in Hanoi and ride it to HCM and leave it there. And opposit too of course. They even had a third office somewhere in the middle.
Sounds like the same guy I referred to in post #12 who also rented from Tigit.
Was he riding a new Viet made air-cooled Honda 250 dirtbike ?
 

Snakeboy

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Dec 30, 2013
Location
RTW
Bikes
Honda Crf 250L 2012, Yamaha XT660Z Tenere 2011
Sounds like the same guy I referred to in post #12 who also rented from Tigit.
Was he riding a new Viet made air-cooled Honda 250 dirtbike ?
Nah - this guy was on 125 Honda Wave I think....
 

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